Wind And Rain To Hit UK But Hopes Are High For A Warmer Jubilee...

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Strong winds and rain are set to hit the UK next week but forecasters are hopeful the warm weather will return in time for the Jubilee weekend.

Temperatures in London could climb to 24C (75.2F) on Sunday, but by next week rain and strong winds will sweep across most of the country as a result of a strengthening of the jet stream.

Met Office deputy chief meteorologist Dan Rudman said: "The strengthening of the jet stream increases the chances of low-pressure systems developing over the Atlantic being pushed towards the UK.

"Although there are still some details to be determined on the depth and timings of these lows, what we do know is that there's some unsettled weather on the way next week, with some strong winds likely from the middle of the week, especially in the north.

"Weather of this nature isn't unusual in a UK spring, with changes in the jet stream frequently bringing interludes of unsettled weather."

Temperatures of 16C (61F) are expected next week in the South West and 14C (57F) in parts of the North East.
A man walks past a puddle reflecting the London Eye.

The average temperature for the month of May in England is 16C (60.8F), but temperatures soared to 27.5C (81.5F) on Tuesday in south-eastern areas.

Forecasters now consider the possibility of blood rain, when relatively high concentrations of red dust or particles get mixed into rain and make it look red-hued as it falls, to be unlikely.

Blood rain, when it occurs in the UK, often leaves desert sand residue on cars and other surfaces.

Despite the gloomy forecast for the coming week, there is no need to cancel outdoor Jubilee street parties just yet, as the Met Office offers cautious optimism for kora goal the June bank holiday.

They said: "We're still some two weeks away from the Jubilee Weekend, but the long-range outlook shows a trend for some possible warm weather in southern areas, and closer to average temperatures further north."